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Tracing Memories in Border-Space

  • Clemens BernardtEmail author
  • Bettina van Hoven
  • Paulus Huigen
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Prisons and Penology book series (PSIPP)

Abstract

As Jones and Garde-Hansen noted, “Memories well up out of the depths of the unconscious and/or work away as (dis)enabling background. They are not static information, but are reworked in the light of current practice, and at the same time shape that practice” (2012, 161). This chapter critically discusses the impact of memory practices in the context of the asylum procedure on an asylum seeker’s identity work.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Clemens Bernardt
    • 1
    Email author
  • Bettina van Hoven
    • 1
  • Paulus Huigen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Cultural GeographyUniversity of GroningenGroningenThe Netherlands

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