Advertisement

East Asian Men pp 219-235 | Cite as

Beyond the Celebration of Losers: The Construction of diaosi Masculinity in Contemporary Chinese Youth Culture

  • Siyang Cao
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter offers a critical examination on the discursive construction of diaosi masculinity in Chinese web-series and problematizes the simplistic reading of it as a celebration of losers. This chapter argues that diaosi appears to be a floating concept of identity that challenges hegemonic values and overturns normality while reinforcing ruling masculine discourse at the same time. Moreover, Siyang explores the ambiguity of late modernity and individualization that have been attached to contemporary Chinese society, as well as suggesting a more socially located approach to look at young people in cyberspace, given the increasing fragmentation and diversification of youth culture and identity.

Keywords

Cultural Capital Male Identity Youth Culture Identity Label Discursive Construction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Beck, U., & Beck-Gernsheim, E. (2002). Individualization: Institutionalized individualism and its social and political consequences. London: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
  2. Cai, R. (2013). Diaosi de nixishi—wangluo yawenhua chuanbo guankui (The counterattack of diaosi: An investigation into the dissemination of network subculture). Jin Chuanmei (Today’s Mass Media), 9, 23–24.Google Scholar
  3. Carpini, M., & Williams, B. (2001). Let us infotain you: Politics in the new media environment. In W. Bennett & R. Entman (Eds.), Mediated politics: Communication in the future of democracy. New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Damm, J. (2007). The internet and the fragmentation of Chinese society. Critical Asian Studies, 39(2), 273–294.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Dong, H., & Huang, Q. (2013). Diaosi liuxing ji yiyun fenxi (An analysis of diaosi popularity). Zhongguo Qingnian Yanjiu (China Youth Studies), 1, 5–8.Google Scholar
  6. Gong, H., & Yang, X. (2010). Digitized parody: The politics of egao in contemporary China. China Information, 24(1), 3–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Hall, S. (1997). ‘The spectacle of the “other”’ in S. Hall (eds.) Representation: cultural representations and signifying practices. London: Sage in association with the Open University.Google Scholar
  8. Herold, D. (2011). Introduction: Noise, spectacle, politics: Carnival in Chinese cyberspace. In D. Herold & P. Marolt (Eds.), Online society in China: Creating, celebrating and instrumentalising the online carnival. Abingdon: Routledge.Google Scholar
  9. Herring, S. C. (2008). Questioning the generational divide: Technological exoticism and adult constructions of online youth identity. In D. Buckingham (Ed.), Youth, identity, and digital media. London: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  10. Hu, X. (2013). Hou xinshiqi caogen wenhua jiedu (The interpretation of grassroots culture in the post-new-period). MA Hons thesis. Hunan University of Science and Technology.Google Scholar
  11. Kluver, R., & Yang, C. (2005). The internet in China: A meta-review of research. The Information Society, 21(4), 301–308.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Li, H. (2011). Parody and resistance on the Chinese internet. In D. Herold & P. Marolt (Eds.), Online society in China: Creating, celebrating and instrumentalising the online carnival. Abingdon: Routledge.Google Scholar
  13. Lin, P. (2013). Cong wangluo yawenhua dao gongyong nengzhi—diaosi wenhua pipan (From internet subculture to universal signifier—a critique of diaosi culture). Wenyi Yanjiu (Literature & Art Studies), 10, 37–43.Google Scholar
  14. Liu, W. (2008). Dui wangluo caogen wenhua xiaoji taishi de fansi (Reflecting the negative trend of internet grassroots culture). Gaodeng Jiaoyuyu Xueshu Yanjiu. Higher Education and Research, 7, 187–189.Google Scholar
  15. Liu, F. (2011). Urban youth in China: Modernity, the internet and the self. New York/London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  16. Meng, B. (2011). From steamed bun to grass mud horse: E Gao as alternative political discourse on the Chinese internet. Global Media and Communication, 7(1), 33–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Nixon, S. (1997). Exhibiting masculinity. In S. Hall (Ed.), Representation: Cultural representations and signifying practices. London: Sage in association with the Open University.Google Scholar
  18. Qian, P. (2013, January 6). 10 most popular Internet phrases in China in 2012. ChinaHush. http://www.chinahush.com/2013/01/06/10-most-popular-internet-phrases-in-china-in-2012/. Accessed 26 Feb 2015.
  19. Shen, Y. (2014). Wangluo zizhiju zhong diaosi xingxiang wenhua piping—yi diaosi nanshi weili (A critique of ‘diaosi’ figure in web-seies—a case study of Diors Man). Jiangxi Qingnian Zhiye Xueyuan Xuebao (Journal of Jiangxi Youth Vocational College), 24(6), 14–16 21.Google Scholar
  20. Skeggs, B. (1997). Formations of class and gender: Becoming respectable. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  21. Song, G., & Hird, D. (2013). Men and masculinities in contemporary China. Leiden: Brill.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Szablewica, M. (2014). The “losers” of China’s internet: Memes as “structures of feeling” for disillusioned young netizens. China Information, 28(2), 259–275.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Weber, S., & Mitchell, C. (2008). Imaging, keyboarding, and posting identities: Young people and new media technologies. In D. Buckingham (Ed.), Youth, identity, and digital media. London: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  24. Yan, Y. (2009). The individualization of Chinese society. Oxford: Burg Publishers.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Siyang Cao
    • 1
  1. 1.University of YorkYorkUK

Personalised recommendations