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Labor Denigration and Work–Family Conflict

  • Jiping Zuo
Chapter
  • 570 Downloads
Part of the Politics and Development of Contemporary China book series (PDCC)

Abstract

This chapter provides the backdrop to women’s lived experiences under post-Mao market reform (1978–present) in urban China. It first describes the state–family disaggregation of the post-Mao era evidenced by the state’s retreat as the provider of social welfare for urban families and the introduction of market forces shuffling families into the private domain. It then tackles the issue of labor denigration and work–family conflict resulting from state–family disaggregation compared to the state-socialist period, despite increased family autonomy, individual freedom, and a rising standard of living.

Keywords

Sick Leave Family Conflict Informal Sector Female Worker Maternity Leave 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jiping Zuo
    • 1
  1. 1.St. Cloud State UniversitySaint CloudUSA

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