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Equalizing Gender and Class

  • Jiping Zuo
Chapter
  • 628 Downloads
Part of the Politics and Development of Contemporary China book series (PDCC)

Abstract

Using a historical approach, the chapter examines the process of state–family integration under state socialism during the Mao era (1949–1978). More specifically, it depicts ways in which patriarchal families have been transformed in an egalitarian direction, and the state has been molded into a paternalistic system exercising tight control over the economic and political lives of families while providing extensive social welfare benefits to urban families and forging common interests. It also discusses how the state has transformed gender and class both within and outside the family without weakening families as intact reproductive units. The cultural notion of obligation equality is introduced in this chapter to help the reader better understand China’s unique contours in gender and class transformation processes.

Keywords

Work Unit Cultural Revolution Urban Woman Woman Worker Labor Insurance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jiping Zuo
    • 1
  1. 1.St. Cloud State UniversitySaint CloudUSA

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