Advertisement

Genesis and the Animal–Human Community

  • Michael J. GilmourEmail author
Chapter
Part of the The Palgrave Macmillan Animal Ethics Series book series

Abstract

Underlying Lewis’s fascination with the Genesis image of Adam and Eve in the Garden with “every beast of the field” (2:19) is the certainty that nature and all the creatures populating earth, sky, and sea are good (1:31). Paradise is lost, yes, but hope remains. Faith clings to the expectation of a restoration, which means, as St. Paul puts it, an end to creation’s groaning. If this is the case, there are implications for Christian ethics in the present. Animal suffering is an evil requiring the response of God’s people while they await the kingdom of God in its fullness. This includes advocacy on behalf of suffering animals.

References

  1. Adams, Edward. “Retrieving the Earth from the Conflagration: 2 Peter 3.5–13 and the Environment.” In Ecological Hermeneutics: Biblical, Historical and Theological Perspectives. Edited by David G. Horrell, Cherryl Hunt, Christopher Southgate, and Francesca Stavrakopoulou. 108–120. London T&T Clark, 2010.Google Scholar
  2. Filmer-Davies, Cath. “C. S. Lewis.” In The Oxford Handbook of English Literature and Theology. Edited by Andrew W. Hass, David Jasper, and Elisabeth Jay. 655–668. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007.Google Scholar
  3. Ford, Paul F. Companion to Narnia: A Complete Guide to the Magical World of C. S. Lewis’s The Chronicles of Narnia. Revised and Expanded Edition. New York: HarperCollins, 2005.Google Scholar
  4. Gilmour, Michael J. “C. S. Lewis and Animal Experimentation.” Perspectives on Science and Christian Faith 67.4 (2015): 254–262.Google Scholar
  5. Gullone, Eleonora. Animal Cruelty, Antisocial Behaviour, and Aggression: More than a Link. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.Google Scholar
  6. Hauerwas, Stanley. “On Violence.” In The Cambridge Companion to C. S. Lewis. Edited by Robert MacSwain and Michael Ward. 189–202. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010.Google Scholar
  7. Hazard, Holly. “Humane Education.” In The Global Guide to Animal Protection. Edited by Andrew Linzey. 286–287. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2013.Google Scholar
  8. Hobgood-Oster, Laura. A Dog’s History of the World: Canines and the Domestication of Humans. Waco: Baylor University Press, 2014.Google Scholar
  9. Jacobs, Alan. The Narnian: The Life and Imagination of C. S. Lewis. New York: HarperSanFrancisco, 2006.Google Scholar
  10. Johnson, Samuel. Johnson on Shakespeare: Essays and Notes Selected and Set Forth with an Introduction. Edited by Sir Walter Raleigh. London: Henry Frowde, 1908.Google Scholar
  11. Laurent, John. “C. S. Lewis and Animal Rights.” Mythlore 19.1 [Issue 71] (1993): 46–51.Google Scholar
  12. Lewis, C. S. All My Road Before Me: The Diary of C. S. Lewis 1922–1927. Edited by Walter Hooper. San Diego: Harcourt, 1991.Google Scholar
  13. ———. The Allegory of Love: A Study in Medieval Traditions. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013.Google Scholar
  14. ———. The Collected Letters of C. S. Lewis. Volume 3. Narnia, Cambridge, and Joy 1950–1963. Edited by Walter Hooper. New York: HarperCollins, 2007.Google Scholar
  15. ———. A Grief Observed. In The Complete C. S. Lewis Signature Classics. 647–688. New York: HarperCollins, 2002.Google Scholar
  16. ———. The Horse and His Boy. New York: HarperCollins, 1994.Google Scholar
  17. ———. The Last Battle. New York: HarperCollins, 1994.Google Scholar
  18. ———. Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012.Google Scholar
  19. ———. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. New York: HarperCollins, 1994.Google Scholar
  20. ———. The Magician’s Nephew. New York: HarperCollins, 1994.Google Scholar
  21. ———. Out of the Silent Planet. London: HarperCollins, 2005.Google Scholar
  22. ———. Perelandra. London: HarperCollins, 2005.Google Scholar
  23. ———. The Pilgrim’s Regress: An Allegorical Apology for Christianity, Reason and Romanticism. Glasgow: Collins, 1977.Google Scholar
  24. ———. Poems. New York: HarperOne, 2017.Google Scholar
  25. ———. Prince Caspian: The Return to Narnia. New York: HarperCollins, 1994.Google Scholar
  26. ———. The Problem of Pain. In The Complete C. S. Lewis Signature Classics. 543–646. New York: HarperCollins, 2002.Google Scholar
  27. ———. Spirits in Bondage: A Cycle of Lyrics. New York: HarperOne, 2017.Google Scholar
  28. ———. Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012.Google Scholar
  29. ———. That Hideous Strength: A Modern Fairy-Tale for Grown-Ups. London: HarperCollins, 2005.Google Scholar
  30. ———. “Vivisection.” In God in the Dock: Essays on Theology and Ethics. Edited by Walter Hooper. 224–228. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1970.Google Scholar
  31. ———. The Voyage of the ‘Dawn Treader’. New York: HarperCollins, 1994.Google Scholar
  32. ———. “Why I Am Not a Pacifist.” In The Weight of Glory and Other Addresses. 64–90. New York: HarperOne, 2000.Google Scholar
  33. ———, ed. George MacDonald: An Anthology. New York: HarperCollins, 2001.Google Scholar
  34. Li, Chien-Hui. “Mobilizing Christianity in the Antivivisection Movement in Victorian Britain.” Journal of Animal Ethics 2.2 (2012): 141–161.Google Scholar
  35. Linzey, Andrew, ed. The Link between Animal Abuse and Human Violence. Eastbourne: Sussex Academic Press, 2009.Google Scholar
  36. Maier, Harry O. “Green Millennialism: American Evangelicals, Environmentalism and the Book of Revelation.” In Ecological Hermeneutics: Biblical, Historical and Theological Perspectives. Edited by David G. Horrell, Cherryl Hunt, Christopher Southgate, and Francesca Stavrakopoulou. 246–265. London T&T Clark, 2010.Google Scholar
  37. Malamud, Randy. “Coetzee and Animals, Literature and Philosophy.” Journal of Animal Ethics 2.2 (2012): 212–215.Google Scholar
  38. Manguel, Alberto, and Gianni Guadalupi, eds. The Dictionary of Imaginary Places. Toronto: Vintage, 2001.Google Scholar
  39. McGrath, Alister. C. S. Lewis—Eccentric Genius, Reluctant Prophet: A Life. Carol Stream, Illinois: Tyndale, 2013.Google Scholar
  40. Regan, Tom, and Andrew Linzey, eds. Other Nations: Animals in Modern Literature. Baylor: Baylor University Press, 2010.Google Scholar
  41. Schwartz, Sanford. C. S. Lewis on the Final Frontier: Science and the Supernatural in the Space Trilogy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009.Google Scholar
  42. Shakespeare, William. The Norton Shakespeare: Based on the Oxford Edition. 2nd ed. Edited by Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 2008.Google Scholar
  43. Wright, N. T. Surprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church. New York: HarperOne, 2008.Google Scholar
  44. Zamir, Tzachi. “Literary Works and Animal Ethics.” In The Oxford Handbook of Animal Ethics. Edited by Tom L. Beauchamp and R. G. Frey. 932–955. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Providence University CollegeOtterburneCanada

Personalised recommendations