Letters to Italy: Translation and Religion in Nineteenth-Century Ireland

  • Anne O’Connor
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Translating and Interpreting book series (PTTI)

Abstract

This chapter assesses how translation was used to promote certain religious worldviews and values in nineteenth-century Ireland. Using the private correspondence of Cardinal Paul Cullen (1803–1878) as a case study, it demonstrates, through close textual analysis, how his translation efforts were an effective means of advancing a religious view and how private letters had a public function in promoting ideologies. Although printed works are generally studied as translation outputs, this chapter instead uses private correspondence to demonstrate that important translation activity can also take place in alternative realms. The stream of translation present in private letters shows how translation was an important element of the multilingual world of the Catholic Church and how essential it was for communication, self-promotion, and influence in this period.

Keywords

Nineteenth Century Source Text Letter Writer Religious Worldview Private Correspondence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne O’Connor
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Languages, Literatures and CulturesNational University of IrelandGalwayIreland

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