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Conclusion: A Possible Way Out

  • Lorenzo Natali
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Green Criminology book series (PSGC)

Abstract

In this chapter, I suggest that visual research in green criminology may help (1) in exploring the silent knowledge of social actors of different social, cultural and ecological contexts; and (2) in bridging cultural and natural worlds, thereby crossing the dichotomous divide between what is natural and what is social. During this journey towards knowledge and understanding, it is essential to develop not only flexible methods, but also elastic conceptual tools—instruments sensitive enough to capture the vagueness and elusiveness of environmental issues without severely diminishing their multiple dimensions. Taking into account visual dimensions and using photographs as tools of qualitative research represent a precious means of addressing new ways of looking at, seeing and sensing these complex questions, promoting thoughts not yet formulated, new questions and answers.

Keywords

Criminological imagination Environmental harm Visual methodologies Environmental victimization Collaborative research 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lorenzo Natali
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and Social ResearchUniversity of Milano-BicoccaMilanItaly

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