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The Involvement of Non-profit Organizations in Prisoner Reentry in the UK: Prisoner Awareness and Engagement

  • Rosie Meek
  • Dina Gojkovic
  • Alice Mills
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Prisons and Penology book series (PSIPP)

Abstract

In the context of increased involvement of nonprofit organizations in criminal justice, this chapter has two primary aims: to explore the extent of nonprofit involvement in prisoner reentry and to capture awareness of, and engagement with, nonprofit organizations from the perspectives of those serving prison sentences. This chapter presents the results of a national survey (n = 680) and interview study (n = 254) carried out in England, which explored the extent of prisoners’ involvement with nonprofit organizations in meeting their reentry needs. Findings are discussed in the context of the changing role of nonprofit organizations in prisoner reentry. Reprinted from the Journal of Offender Rehabilitation.

Keywords

Criminal Justice Nonprofit Organization Credit Union Prison Staff Housing Organization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rosie Meek
    • 1
  • Dina Gojkovic
    • 2
  • Alice Mills
    • 3
  1. 1.Royal Holloway University of LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.University of SouthamptonSouthamptonUK
  3. 3.University of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand

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