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Non-profit and Voluntary Sector Programs in Prisons and Jails: Perspectives from England and the USA

  • Emma Hughes
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Prisons and Penology book series (PSIPP)

Abstract

In this chapter, the author draws on qualitative interview research to examine the role that community volunteers and non-profit organizations can play in providing rehabilitative programming in prisons and jails. The chapter spans voluntary sector provision in England and California and includes the perspectives of community volunteers and incarcerated individuals who have participated in a variety of educational and faith-based programs. The chapter also examines the effect of this provision on experiences of incarceration, preparation for reentry, and on encouraging a desire to give back. The implications for self-identity, desistance, and prison culture are discussed, including particular benefits that can emerge through building bridges between prisons and outside communities. Last, the chapter considers why some facilities may be more amenable to volunteers than others.

Keywords

Distance Learner Correctional Facility Voluntary Sector Community Volunteer Prison System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emma Hughes
    • 1
  1. 1.California State UniversityFresnoUSA

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