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Before Sincerity: Pagan Beliefs of Language and Emotion

  • Graham Williams
Chapter
Part of the New Approaches to English Historical Linguistics book series (NAEHL)

Abstract

This chapter surveys evidence for pre- and transitionally Christian culture, and especially views toward language and its relationship to emotions, using Old Norse and Old English sources. After considering pagan Germanic culture, including runes, charms and oaths, it argues that sincerity was not a concept before Christian intervention.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of EnglishUniversity of SheffieldSheffieldUK

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