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Research into Textbook Portrayals of National Socialism and the Holocaust

  • Stuart Foster
  • Eleni Karayianni
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter analysed 37 textbook studies focusing on portrayals of National Socialism and/or the Holocaust in international research conducted between 1962 and 2015. Analysis of these studies revealed a range of perspectives and approaches and differences in content choice, purpose, scope, chronological span, and geographical coverage. Although some innovative and exemplary practice was evidenced, many studies failed to clearly articulate a guiding rationale and purpose. Furthermore, studies often provided only limited reference to how theory and theoretical perspectives shaped the research process, and explicit reference to methodological procedures varied in degree and quality. A key feature of the chapter, therefore, is the identification of examples of strong and interesting practice and the development of recommendations for future studies underpinned by clear rationales, theoretical frameworks, and methodological procedures.

References

Textbook Studies Analysed

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stuart Foster
    • 1
  • Eleni Karayianni
    • 1
  1. 1.UCL Centre for Holocaust EducationLondonUK

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