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Introduction: The Global in the Family

  • Riitta Högbacka
Chapter

Abstract

Högbacka draws out the contours of the whole book. She reviews recent changes in the order of countries of origin and destination showing the increasing importance of Africa. She then situates transnational adoption within the context of the Global North–South divide and explores the consequences for both adopters and families of origin. She also explicates her use of agency as an analytical tool. This chapter concludes with a reflexive account of how the research interviews were produced, showing Högbacka’s own role as an adoptive mother engaging with the South African first mothers.

Keywords

Social Worker Adoptive Parent Adoptable Child Adoptive Family Adoptive Mother 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Riitta Högbacka
    • 1
  1. 1.University of HelsinkiHelsinkiFinland

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