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Social and Institutional Power Structures Meet Duoethnography: The Pedagogy of Negotiating Roles, Dismantling Santa, and “Tilting” bitch

  • Callie Spencer Schultz
  • Karen Paisley
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, we employ a screenplay format to duoethnographically explore the currere (Pinar, W. (1975). Currere: Toward reconceptualization. In W. F. Pinar (Ed.), Curriculum theorizing: The reconceptualists (pp. 396–414). Berkely, CA: McCutchan; Pinar, W. (1995). The method of Currere (1975). In W. F. Pinar (Ed.), Autobiography, politics and sexuality: Essays in curriculum theory 1972–1992 (pp. 19–27). New York: Peter Lang.) of our student/professor relationship, tracing and restorying our experiences of navigating power dynamics as our institutional and social relationships changed over time. As we performatively write this piece, we invite readers to join us as we reposition ourselves back into our stories in order to pedagogically “disrupt our perceptions of our lives (or gain a greater awareness of them)” (Sawyer, R. D., & Norris, J. (2013). Duoethnography: Understanding qualitative research. New York: Oxford University Press. p. 297).

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Callie Spencer Schultz
    • 1
  • Karen Paisley
    • 2
  1. 1.Communication Studies and Physical Education, Health, and RecreationEastern Washington UniversityCheneyUSA
  2. 2.College of Health, University of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA

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