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Katherine Austen’s Reckoning with Plague in Book M

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Part of the Early Modern Literature in History book series (EMLH)

Abstract

Following the death of King James, Anna Ley composed a poem on the plague outbreak of 1625. The verse, collected with her and her husband’s writing in the ‘William Andrews Clark Memorial Library MS L6815 M3 C734’, weaves a complex tale of causality between the chaos brought on by pestilence and the death of a king. Describing the grim state of the plague epidemic and the national hardship of a lost monarch, Ley writes:

Keywords

Life Writing Occasional Meditations Early Modern Women Highbury Plague Writing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.SalemUnited States

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