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Aspects of Intermediality: Objective Agency, Wonderment, and Transversal Refractions from the Age of Shakespeare

  • Bryan Reynolds ((with sections by zooz [Bryan Reynolds & Sam Kolodezh] and Kristin Keating Fracchia & Bryan Reynolds))
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Performance and Technology book series (PSPT)

Abstract

omething that every theater-maker knows is that objects perform. Or, they are made to perform. Performance theorists and theater semioticians have a term for this, “ostention.

Keywords

Audience Member Literary Text Subjective Territory Early Modern Period Faith Healing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bryan Reynolds ((with sections by zooz [Bryan Reynolds & Sam Kolodezh] and Kristin Keating Fracchia & Bryan Reynolds))
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of DramaUniversity of CaliforniaIrvineUSA

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