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Identities: How Scientists Represent Collectives, Construct Identities, and Make Sense of Science

  • Sarah R. Davies
  • Maja Horst
Chapter

Abstract

Much research on science communication has focused on scientists as the disseminators of scientific knowledge. There’s an implicit sense that it is individual scientists who are the important actors in science communication—those who define its practice, and whose experiences and opinions we need to better understand. Just as Rae Goodell’s seminal book The Visible Scientists,1 published in 1975, presented a version of science communication defined by the way in which major scientific figures chose to engage with the public, there has been continued interest in why particular scientists get involved in public communication and what their experiences are of it. Research has shown that scientists cite benefits to themselves or to their research (personal enjoyment and gaining insight from interacting with public audiences), to society (informing public debate and empowering laypeople through access to science), or to individuals (educating or enthusing audiences).2 Often, scientists are motivated by a wish to improve public interest, awareness, understanding, and enthusiasm for science.3

Keywords

Science Communication Research Organisation Organisational Member Public Engagement Public Communication 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarah R. Davies
    • 1
  • Maja Horst
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Media, Cognition and CommunicationUniversity of CopenhagenKøbenhavn SDenmark

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