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Folding Pedagogy: Thinking Between Spaces

  • Jack Richardson
Chapter
Part of the Education, Psychoanalysis, and Social Transformation book series (PEST)

Abstract

In this chapter, Richardson reflects on a graduate art education course he co-taught that had students reflect on the philosophical ideas developed by Deleuze and Guattari as the foundation for igniting discussion and producing artworks. The pedagogical process that produced in-depth conversations and unique artworks belied easy categorization. Deleuze and Guattari’s ideas opened students to novel thinking and unique approaches to artmaking in ways that conventional pedagogical approaches to studio art practices seem unable to replicate. This chapter seeks to articulate a pedagogical approach to teaching and learning corresponding to Deleuze’s concept of the fold as an endlessly connected plane of experience, what the author refers to as a folding pedagogy that presupposes no particular outcome, but rather opens students to thinking produced within endless encounter.

Keywords

Pedagogical Approach Connected Plane Architectural Form Good Pedagogical Practice Summer Seminar 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack Richardson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Secondary Education/Department of Arts Administration, Education and PolicyThe Ohio State UniversityNewarkUSA

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