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A Critical Introduction to What Is Art Education?

  • jan jagodzinski
Chapter
Part of the Education, Psychoanalysis, and Social Transformation book series (PEST)

Abstract

This book draws its inspiration from the problematic raised by Deleuze and Guattari in their last book together, What is Philosophy?, which has been influential across many sectors of the academy due to the breadth of domains it addresses. Philosophy, science and art are each accounted for, and each discipline is attributed with its own distinct method, field of inquiry and orientation: succinctly put, philosophy is defined by its ability to create ‘pure concepts’; science, on the other hand, is charged to discover knowledge via functions and domains of reference, or regions as specific states of affairs; and lastly art creates new worlds of perception via blocs of affects and percepts.

Keywords

Mirror Neuron Original Emphasis Autopoietic System Indefinite Article Critical Introduction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • jan jagodzinski
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Secondary EducationUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada

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