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The Co-evolution of EU’s Eastern Enlargement and LGBT Politics: An Ever Gayer Union?

  • Koen Slootmaeckers
  • Heleen Touquet
  • Peter Vermeersch
Chapter
Part of the Gender and Politics book series (GAP)

Abstract

The EU identifies and presents itself as an organisation founded on ‘fundamental values’ and as a defender and guardian of fundamental rights. The development of this ‘fundamental rights myth’ (Journal of Common Market Studies 48(1):45–66, 2010) has taken place against the broader backdrop of a globalisation of human rights discourse (Journal of Common Market Studies 48(1):45–66, 2010; McGill Law Journal 49(4):951–968, 2004). Fundamental values have also increasingly become the narrative driving EU foreign policy, including enlargement and neighbourhood policies. As Article 3(5) clarifies, ‘In its relations with the wider world, the [European] Union shall uphold and promote its values and interests and contribute to the protection of its citizens. It shall contribute to […] the protection of human rights’. Article 49 sets forth respect for the so-called founding values—‘respect for human dignity, freedom, democracy, equality, the rule of law and respect for human rights’ (Art. 2 TEU)—as a precondition for EU membership.

Keywords

Candidate Country Accession Process Enlargement Policy Western Balkan Country LGBT People 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Koen Slootmaeckers
    • 1
  • Heleen Touquet
    • 2
  • Peter Vermeersch
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Politics and International RelationsQueen Mary University of LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.Leuven International and European Studies (LINES)KU Leuven – University of LeuvenLeuvenBelgium
  3. 3.Leuven International and European Studies (LINES)KU Leuven – University of LeuvenLeuvenBelgium

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