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Post-What? Global Advocacy and Its Disconnects: The Cairo Legacy and the Post-2015 Agenda

  • Rishita Nandagiri
Chapter
Part of the Gender, Development and Social Change book series (GDSC)

Abstract

The world has changed drastically since the transnational and international advocacy (primarily at the UN) of the 1990s, and it is now much easier to organise actions across geographies and time. The advent of email and instant messaging, and the vastly improved telecommunications channels, have left behind the days of using up a few thousand reams of paper to fax each other strategies, updates and language recommendations.

Keywords

Feminist Movement Safe Space Dense Language Indian Penal Code Young People Today 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rishita Nandagiri
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Social PolicyLSELondonUK

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