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Dialectics of Self-Realization and the Common Good in the Philosophy of T.H. Green

  • Janusz Grygieńć
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Abstract

This paper attempts to systematize possible explanations of the interrelations binding the categories of self-realization and the common good in the philosophy of Thomas Hill Green. Six possible lines of argument are named and analyzed—the salvation argument, the communitarian argument, the reconciliation argument, the non-competitiveness argument, the natural sentiments argument, and the institutional argument. Each one is based on different epistemological or ethical assumptions, which makes some of them impossible to reconcile with others or with the overall character of Green’s moral and social philosophy. After eliminating the arguments most susceptible to justified criticism, the paper proposes a definition of Green’s conception of the relations binding individual with common good.

Keywords

Political Philosophy Moral Obligation Common Good Moral Development Ethical Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Janusz Grygieńć
    • 1
  1. 1.Nicolaus Copernicus UniversityToruńPoland

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