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Sarah Kane: Ancient and Contemporary Royal Tragedies

  • Catherine ReesEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Adaptation in Theatre and Performance book series (ATP)

Abstract

In the only chapter to explore a single text, this discussion analyses Kane’s adaptation of Seneca’s Phaedra . It outlines the development of the myth in ancient and more contemporary eras and examines the relationship between classical Greece and Rome and the shock and violence of the artistic scene in 1990s Britain. This chapter seeks to unearth the resonances between a classical myth about the disintegration of a royal family with specific events in modern Britain, most specifically scandals in the British royal family and the wider disintegration of the traditional family. In this way, Kane is seen to take an ancient myth and adapt it to her own context and landscape, analysing the nature of tragedy and exploring the resonant echoes between the two texts and the two eras.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Loughborough UniversityLoughboroughUK

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