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Marina Carr: Classical Tragedy for Modern Ireland

  • Catherine ReesEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Adaptation in Theatre and Performance book series (ATP)

Abstract

This chapter explores the juxtaposition between ancient Greek mythology and modern Ireland as Carr’s two plays— By the Bog of Cats and Ariel—are discussed alongside the Euripidean plays that inspired them. The chapter outlines some of the major cultural and political events in contemporary Irish history, as well as exploring some of the specific feminist issues facing Ireland in the twentieth century. The limits of adaptation as a process are also examined, as Carr’s plays have a tangential relationship with their classical sources. The chapter explores the status of outsiders and transgressors in their own national cultures, as well as considering some of the scandals and traumas that have displaced Ireland’s dependence on traditional religion and national politics in the contemporary era.

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Loughborough UniversityLoughboroughUK

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