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Building the Wooden Horse Together? Mutuality and Contestation in the Knowledge Market

  • Zane Ma Rhea
Chapter
Part of the Postcolonial Studies in Education book series (PCSE)

Abstract

This chapter begins with closer examination of the influence of khwaamrúutjàakpainôk outsider knowledge on Thai knowledge, building on the previous chapters of this section. It draws on interviews and official documents together with emerging research in the field to develop an understanding of the exchange of university knowledge between Thailand and countries such as Australia, a longstanding bilateral partner but one whose own interests have developed and changed over the past 20 years as have those of Thailand. Indeed, besides internal drivers, both nations have experienced the strengths and limitations of the increasingly interconnected and interdependent global economy.

Keywords

National Interest Foreign Affair Education Service Mutual Benefit Gross National Income 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zane Ma Rhea
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of EducationVictoriaAustralia

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