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The Thai Máhǎawíttáyaalai University

  • Zane Ma Rhea
Chapter
Part of the Postcolonial Studies in Education book series (PCSE)

Abstract

This chapter moves the book to a specific examination of the ways of knowing that are cultivated and disseminated within the máhaˇawíttáyaalai university. Thailand has well-established universities and has been involved in the international exchange of university knowledge since the inception of its first national higher education máhaˇawíttáyaalai, Chulalongkorn University. It will first discuss the Thai university system, outlining its philosophical and historical foundations. It will then briefly reflect on the establishment of a colonial outpost, Australia, a country that has had a bilateral university relationship with Thailand for over 70 years. Finally, it will focus on the impact of increasing globalisation on the modern Thai máhaˇawíttáyaalai.

Keywords

Deep Examination Petrol Tanker Thai People Thai Society Thai Student 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zane Ma Rhea
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of EducationVictoriaAustralia

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