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Lexical Facility and Language Program Placement

  • Michael Harrington
Chapter
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Abstract

This chapter presents two studies that gauge the sensitivity of the lexical facility measures to English proficiency differences as defined by language program placement. Study 4 compares the predictive power of the lexical facility measures with that of an in-house placement test at a language school in Australia. Study 5 examines the measures as correlates of program placement in a similar setting in Singapore.

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Harrington
    • 1
  1. 1.University of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia

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