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Social Approaches to Distress: From Enclosures to Fluid Spaces

  • Carl Walker
  • Angie Hart
  • Paul Hanna
Chapter

Abstract

A few years ago one of us (CW) decided to use some free time to volunteer at a local project which supported unemployed families. This was a project in Brighton where people could go to do a range of things. They could receive benefit advice, it had a crèche for children, computer classes, art and photography and yoga classes. They could get very cheap subsidised vegan meals and they had a tea bar and social space where people could just come and hang out, drink tea, chat to others or stare out of the window. I was placed on the tea bar. In between repeatedly making tea that was either too milky or too strong, I got to look at the big room where people would just be; drink tea, chat, use the internet and mill around.

Keywords

Mental Distress Fluid Space Mental Health Service User Therapeutic Landscape Therapeutic Culture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carl Walker
    • 1
  • Angie Hart
    • 2
  • Paul Hanna
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Applied Social ScienceUniversity of BrightonBrightonUK
  2. 2.School of Health Sciences and Boingboing Social EnterpriseUniversity of BrightonBrightonUK
  3. 3.School of Hospitality and Tourism ManagementUniversity of SurreySurreyUK

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