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The Flawed Assumptions of Psychology and Psychiatry: A Martian Analysis

  • Carl Walker
  • Angie Hart
  • Paul Hanna
Chapter

Abstract

After what seemed like an eternity of watching David’s moods shifting to such radical extremes, it had become more difficult to recognize him than it was to recognize his mood state. He had levelled out for a while. He had been profoundly low, desperate, demented and crawling with the agony of an ever present anxiety for too many months to remember. He was now back on the up. Nobody knows why. He didn’t know why. From experience I gave him about 2 or 3 weeks before the mania really took hold. Before the abuse, the anger, the incoherence, the wild spending, the voices, the discussions about how to counter the people who were following him in order to train him into the secret services, the newly discovered superpowers, the false texts telling me our dad had died, and the repeated threats of suicide. Then the promises that all of these would stop. Then more abuse, anger, rogue secret service agents and dead dads. Our dad must have died more times than Freddy Krueger over the years. Sure enough it was about 2 or 3 weeks. I got a call to tell me that he had gone AWOL leaving a message that he was going to drown himself in the sea. After driving around for 2 hours looking for David I finally found him on the beach staring at the sea. He said he wanted to be left along so that he could throw himself in. I told him that as he wasn’t on a platform it would probably be easier to walk in. If he threw himself, he’d bang his face on the shingle. This raised a smile. The momentary thrill of levity are pretty much all you have in these circumstances. We talked for a while. He said that he couldn’t control the buzzing in his head. Everything was happening so fast inside his head that he couldn’t control it. I said that it might be useful if he talked to a doctor. He thought the same and we walked back from the beach. One day the sea might get its man but not this time.

Keywords

Mental Health Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Service User Mental Distress Individual People 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carl Walker
    • 1
  • Angie Hart
    • 2
  • Paul Hanna
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Applied Social ScienceUniversity of BrightonBrightonUK
  2. 2.School of Health Sciences and Boingboing Social EnterpriseUniversity of BrightonBrightonUK
  3. 3.School of Hospitality and Tourism ManagementUniversity of SurreySurreyUK

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