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The Pestalozzi Principle

  • Tony Hall
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Part of the Digital Education and Learning book series (DEAL)

Abstract

Following a DBR approach, the main practical focus of this book, the development of narrative technology was couched within an evolving conceptual framework. As will be described in the subsequent chapters, the book’s empirical work and evolving theoretical framework worked effectively together to produce an interactive exhibition and a series of design guidelines for narrative technology to enhance education and learning.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tony Hall
    • 1
  1. 1.School of EducationNational University of Ireland GalwayGalwayIreland

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