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Educational Design with a Capital D

  • Tony Hall
Chapter
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Part of the Digital Education and Learning book series (DEAL)

Abstract

Mobilising educational change and innovation, especially with technology, can be very complex, contingent on many different actors and factors (Heppell, 2016). Therefore, the effective deployment and use of narrative technology in education necessitates genuinely principled and participatory engagement by learners/users as co-designers, collaboratively exploring and realising the potential of digital media and storytelling in context. Further, educational innovation is typically emergent and evolutionary, which requires a sustainable and systematic strategy. Practice-based research and in particular educational design and DBR can be usefully appropriated and very helpful in this exacting context. This chapter emphasises the key role that design can play in helping to ensure the successful adoption and adaption of educational technology in learning settings that are inherently complex and diverse.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tony Hall
    • 1
  1. 1.School of EducationNational University of Ireland GalwayGalwayIreland

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