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The Rhetoric of Coalition Bargaining

  • Judi Atkins
Chapter
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Part of the Rhetoric, Politics and Society book series (RPS)

Abstract

The core contention of this volume is that rhetoric is key to managing the competing dynamics of unity and distinctiveness that permeate coalition bargaining. It proceeds from the premise that coalition politics is an ongoing negotiation dialogue which takes place under conditions of ambiguity. Taking Kenneth Burke’s rhetoric of identification as its starting point, the chapter lays the theoretical groundwork for this approach. Next, it distinguishes three forms of identification and division at work within coalition bargaining, namely: ideological, which is concerned with values; instrumental, which is founded on political expediency; and interpersonal, which focuses on the relations between individuals or groups. The chapter concludes by outlining the aims and structure of the book.

Keywords

Coalition Bargaining Negotiation Dialogue Interpersonal Identification Liberal Democrats Coalition Formation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judi Atkins
    • 1
  1. 1.Coventry UniversityCoventryUK

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