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China and International Cooperation on the Environment: Historical and Intellectual Roots of Chinese Thinking about the Environment

  • Ming Wan
Part of the Asia Today book series (ASIAT)

Abstract

The environment is normally viewed as a growing but still low-priority area for a general study of Chinese foreign policy or Sino-US relations, but it is actually central to the Chinese conception of world order from a longer historical lens because it goes to the core of Chinese natural philosophy as the intellectual foundation for its understanding of world order. Thus, China’s orientation toward environmental problems that has deep, enduring, and conflicting historical roots opens a window into its basic attitude toward world order.

Keywords

Chinese Government World Order Chinese Tradition Chinese Foreign Policy Global Environmental Issue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© G. John Ikenberry, Wang Jisi, and Zhu Feng 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ming Wan

There are no affiliations available

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