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Does China Offer a New Paradigm for Doing Science?

  • Joy Yueyue Zhang
Part of the The Nottingham China Policy Institute series book series (NCP)

Abstract

Despite the fact that the idea of ‘science’ has always been associated with China’s modernization, it was not until 1978 that science was for the first time recognized not as an ideology, but as a ‘production force’ which would lead to a better future.1 Since then, China’s every stride towards international excellence in science has been supported by at least three key elements: (1) centralized decision-making, (2) generous but selective state investment, and (3) a regulatory ethos of what I term ‘ post-hoc pragmatism’, which underlines both application-oriented agenda setting and permissive regulation.2

Keywords

Stem Cell Stem Cell Therapy Stem Cell Research Online Access Hybrid Embryo 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes and references

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© Joy Yueyue Zhang 2015

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  • Joy Yueyue Zhang

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