Advertisement

Taiwan’s Role in the Chinese Catholic Church: The Bridging Endeavor

  • Beatrice Leung
  • Wen-ban Kuo

Abstract

Vatican-Taiwan diplomatic relations were adirect outgrowh of the dissolution of Vatican relations with mainland China. Established in 1942, these relations were formally broken in 1951 with the expulsion of the Papal Nuncio Archbishop Antonio Riberi. Riberi, after a short stay in Hong Kong went to Taipei to establish the Nunciature. This relationship has served as both a sticking point on progress in Sino-Vatican relations and a productive party to the Vatican’s efforts to reach out to Catholic communities on the mainland and to build up the Catholic Church in China. This chapter looks back on Taiwan’s role in the history of the Chinese Catholic Church, as a church in exile after the Communist takeover of 1949, and in the Church’s “Bridging Endeavor” in the era of China’s reform and opening-up. It also looks ahead to the future of the Catholic Church in Taiwan vis-à-vis Vatican diplomatic relations and as an instrument of Catholic religious life in Taiwan.

Keywords

Religious Order Chinese Communist Party Democratic Progressive Party Church Leader Diplomatic Relation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. 1.
    In February 1984 when Pope John Paul II received Taiwan Bishops who made their ad liminia visit to the Holy See, the Holy Father made this request. See Beatrice Leung, Sino-Vatican Relations: Problems of Conflicting Authority, 1976–1986 (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1992), pp.189–256.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ye Xiaowen, “Danqian de Zongjiao wenti” (The Contemporary Religious Questions of the Motherland) in Zhonggong zhongyang dangxiao baogao xuan (Selected Reports of the Party Central School) vol. 101, no. 5 (1996), pp. 9–23 (internally circulated document).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Beatrice Leung, “The Catholic Bridging Effort with China,” Religion, State and Society (UK) vol. 28 (June 2000), pp. 185–195.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    For a discussion of the Shanghai resistance in the 1950s, see Paul Mariani, Church Militant: Bishop Kung and Catholic Resistance in Communist Shanghai (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2011).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 7.
    Jean Charbonnier, Guide to the Catholic Church in China 2008 (Singapore: China Catholic Communication, 2008), pp. 68, 206, 327.Google Scholar
  6. 12.
    Jean Charbonnier, Guide to the Catholic Church in China 1986 (Singapore: China Catholic Communication, 1986), p. 14.Google Scholar
  7. 20.
    Qu Haiyuen, The Socio-Political Analysis of the Change of Taiwan Religion (Taiwan zong bianqian de shehui zhengzhi fenxi) (Taiwan: Quai Kuan Press, 1997). Chapter 7, “The Development Trend of the Catholic Church in Taiwan” (Taiwan diqu de tainzhujiao fazhan qushi zhi yanjiu), explains this situation clearly.Google Scholar
  8. 22.
    Ye Xiaowen, “Dangqian woguo de zongjiao wenti: zongjiao wuxing de zaitantao” (The Contemporary Religious Questions of the Motherland: Re-investigation on the Five Characters of Religion) in Zhonggong zhongyang dangxiao baogao xuan (Selected Reports of the Party Central School) vol. 101, no. 5 (1996), pp. 9–23 (internally circulated document).Google Scholar
  9. 24.
    Beatrice Leung, “Communist Party-Vatican Interplay over the Training of Church Leaders in China,” Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion vol. 40, no. 4 (2001), pp. 657–673.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 38.
    Beatrice Leung, “The Catholic Church and HKSAR Government: Conflicting Relations,” in The July 1 Protest Rally, ed. Joseph Cheng (Hong Kong: City University Press, 2005), pp. 529–552.Google Scholar
  11. 46.
    Chen Fang and Jiang Guoxiong, History of Sino-Vatican Diplomatic Relations (Zhong fan waijiao guanxi shi) (Taiwan: Commercial Press, 2003), pp. 27–30.Google Scholar
  12. 49.
    Marcus Wang and Beatrice Leung, “The Triangular Relations among China, Taiwan and the Vatican: A Taiwan Perspective,” in Challenges and Policy Programmes of China’s New Leadership, ed. Joseph Cheng (Hong Kong: City University of Hong Kong Press, 2007), pp. 495–522.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Cindy Yik-yi Chu 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Beatrice Leung
  • Wen-ban Kuo

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations