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Christian Discourses on Religious Diversity in Contemporary China

  • Lai Pan-chiu

Abstract

The Chinese religious tradition seems to be characterized by the coexistence of divergent religions and the affirmation of religious plurality. Given the missionary background of Christianity in China, addressing the question of religious diversity is an important issue for Chinese Christians. This article attempts to analyze the contemporary Chinese Christian discourses on religious diversity, especially the question of how these discourses were shaped by their cultural, religious, social, political and intellectual and ecclesiastical contexts. Before analyzing these discourses, it is important to clarify some of the key terms and thus the scope of this study.

Keywords

Religious Diversity Harmonious Society Christian Theology Christian Church Religious Pluralism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Perry Schmidt-Leukel and Joachim Gentz 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lai Pan-chiu

There are no affiliations available

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