Advertisement

From National to People’s Poverty in Changing Policy Regimes

  • Onalenna Selolwane
Chapter
Part of the Developmental Pathways to Poverty Reduction book series (POD)

Abstract

Today, any analysis of poverty in Botswana must invariably examine it as a problem that affects some sections of the population, such as rural small farmers, the aged and the unemployed. However, at independence in 1966, poverty was a characteristic that defined the country as a whole, including particularly the emerging modern state, which did not command even basic resources to cover its budgetary needs. Not surprisingly, therefore, Botswana’s first attempt at poverty alleviation involved a strategy that focused on aggregate income growth and not on any specific target group of poor people. This strategy would be part of planned development interventions in which the state would play a significant role in marshalling scarce resources to engineer growth and transform the material conditions of the populace. As reflected in the Transitional and succeeding National Development Plans, the strategy aimed for rapid and sustained economic growth with the immediate objective of giving the country budgetary independence and meaning to its sovereignty. It was also a strategy for nation building.

Keywords

Income Inequality State Capacity Macroeconomic Policy Racial Inequality Employment Creation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Carlson, Ellen (2003) To Have and to Hold: Continuity and Change in Property Rights Institutions Governing Water Resources among the Meru of Tanzania and the BaKgatla in Botswana: 1925–2000. Stockholm: Almqvist and Wiksell International.Google Scholar
  2. Colclough, C., Cumming, C. and Sekgoma, G. (1988) Investment Options in Post-Secondary Education (a study undertaken on behalf of the Ministry of Education, University of Botswana).Google Scholar
  3. Gaborone City Council (1997) Gaborone Urban Development Plan 1, 1997–2003. Ministry of Local Government, Lands and Housing.Google Scholar
  4. Gossett, Charles William (1985) The Civil Service in Botswana: Personnel Policies in Comparative Perspective (PhD Thesis, Political Science, Stanford University).Google Scholar
  5. Government of Botswana (1968) National Development Plan 1: April 1968 — March 1973. Gaborone: Government Printer.Google Scholar
  6. Jefferis, Keith (2009) “The Role of TNCs in the Extractive Industry of Botswana”, Transnational Corporations, 18(1), 62–92.Google Scholar
  7. John Burrow and Partners Consulting Engineers, Dalgliesh Lindsay Group Architects and Planners (1975) Broadhurst Stage Two . Vol. 1. Gaborone: Ministry of Local Government and Lands.Google Scholar
  8. John Burrow and Partners Consulting Engineers Dalgliesh Lindsay Group Architects and Planners (1975) Broadhurst Stage Two. Vol. 2 . Gaborone: Ministry of Local Government and Lands.Google Scholar
  9. John Burrow and Partners Consulting Engineers, Dalgliesh Lindsay Group Architects and Planners (1977) Gaborone Growth Study. Gaborone: Ministry of Local Government and Lands.Google Scholar
  10. John Burrow and Partners Consulting Engineers, Dalgliesh Lindsay Group Architects and Planners (1978) Gaborone Growth Study: Final Report: Conclusions and Recommendations. Gaborone: Ministry of Local Government and Lands.Google Scholar
  11. Lipton, Michael (1977) Why Poor People Stay Poor: Urban Bias in World Development. London: Temple Smith.Google Scholar
  12. Mazonde, Isaac (1994) Ranching and Enterprise in Eastern Botswana: a Case Study of Black and White Farmers. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
  13. Nordas, Hildegunn and Abdalla Gergis (2000), Making government Smaller and More Efficient: The Botswana Case. Bergen: Royal Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.Google Scholar
  14. Peters, Pauline (1994) Dividing the Commons: Politics, Policy and Culture in Botswana. Charlottesville and London: University Press of Virginia.Google Scholar
  15. Selolwane, Onalenna (2002) “Monopoly Politikos: How Botswana’s Opposition Parties Have Helped Sustain One-Party Dominance”, African Sociological Review, 6(1): 68–90.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Selolwane, Onalenna (2005) “From Infrastructural Development to Privatization: The Challenges of Employment Creation and Poverty Reduction in Gaborone” in Deborah Bryceson and Debby Potts (eds) African Urban Economies: Viability, Vitality or Vitiation of Major Cities in East and Southern Africa? Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  17. Selolwane, Onalenna (2006) “Botswana: Ethnic Structure and Public Sector Governance” in Yusuf Bangura (ed.) Ethnicity, Inequality and Governance. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  18. Sims, D. (1981) Agro-climatological Information, Crop Requirements and Agricultural Zones for Botswana. Gaborone: Ministry of Agriculture.Google Scholar
  19. Werbner, Richard (2004) Reasonable Radicals and Citizenship in Botswana: The Public Anthropology of Kalanga Elites. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© United Nations Research Institute for Social Development 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Onalenna Selolwane

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations