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Migration and Identities in Hong Kong’s Transition

  • Janet W Salaff

Abstract

Hong Kong’s reversion to China on 1 July, 1997 was unusual. Not only did an underdeveloped Communist country incorporate a world-class city, but scheduled far in advance, the community had time to reflect on the meaning of the transition in their daily lives. There has thus been much interest in how the Hong Kong people defined reversion, and made strategies to meet the challenges.

Keywords

Asian Study Cultural Revolution Family Experience British Colonial Family Economy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Janet W Salaff

There are no affiliations available

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