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China Rising: A Global Transformation?

  • Eva Paus
  • Penelope B. Prime
  • Jon Western

Abstract

China is rising. There seems to be little disagreement about this. With economic growth rates hovering around 10 percent per year for the past 30 years, an enormous demand for global resources, and an increasingly assertive foreign policy, China seems poised to become a major power in the twenty-first century. It is now common to hear politicians, pundits, and academics proclaiming that China will eventually become a peer rival to the United States. But how do we make sense of China’s rise—what does it really mean for China and for the world? Will China emerge within the existing global order, will it play by the existing rules and succeed? Or will China lead an “irresistible shift of global power to the east?” (Mahbubani 2008a) Does China’s rise reflect an impending “great transformation” that will lead to the articulation of alternative development and global governance models?

Keywords

Foreign Direct Investment Gross Domestic Product World Trade Organization Chinese Communist Party United Nations Security Council 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Eva Paus, Penelope B. Prime, and Jon Western 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eva Paus
  • Penelope B. Prime
  • Jon Western

There are no affiliations available

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