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A National Defense Strategy for Taiwan in the New Century

  • Alexander Chieh-cheng Huang

Abstract

In late April 2007, Taiwan news agencies reported that the country’s military had employed newly developed shore-based land-attack cruise missiles in a computer-simulated war with China to take out military installations across the 70 nautical mile-wide Taiwan Strait.1 This was the first time Taiwan military publicly admitted its development of offensive weapons systems after decades of speculations. A week later in a press conference, the de facto US ambassador in Taiwan Stephen Young expressed the American government’s opposition to Taiwan’s development of offensive missiles.2

Keywords

Weapon System Military Capability Information Warfare Military Affair Homeland Defense 
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Notes

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Copyright information

© Peter C. Y. Chow 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexander Chieh-cheng Huang

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