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The Teleology of the State: Top-down Regional Ethnic Autonomy

  • Chih-yu Shih

Abstract

In the twenty-first century, relationships between ethnic minorities and their state will be among the most popular subjects of study in political science in general,1 and in Chinese politics in particular. Officially, China has fifty-five minority groups. In principle, these minorities enjoy administrative autonomy in governing local public policy. Indeed, autonomy has gradually replaced self-determination to become an internationally accepted concept in dealing with domestic ethnic affairs. As compared to the notion of self-determination, autonomy does not require a change of sovereign borders and is thus a sellable solution to the governments in question.

Keywords

Ethnic Minority Ethnic Identity World Trade Organization National Unity Ethnic Culture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Chih-yu Shih 2007

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  • Chih-yu Shih

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