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U.S. Policy and Sino-Japanese Rivalry

  • Mel Gurtov

Abstract

Although tension on the Korean peninsula and in the Taiwan Strait are usually identified as East Asia’s most prominent flash points, rivalry between China and Japan may be the key to peaceful and stable relationships in that region. Sino-Japanese relations have blown hot and cold in cycles ever since the 1950s. Direct conflict has never been a serious possibility, but tensions have frequently run high, and national feelings have been used by both countries to manipulate the behavior of the other. Even today, when the Chinese and Japanese economies are closely intertwined, it is commonly thought that the rivalry is more intense than ever—jing re zheng leng (economically hot, politically cold), as the Chinese say—and dangerous for that reason.

Keywords

Liberal Democratic Party China Policy Missile Defense Security Treaty Yasukuni Shrine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© James C. Hsiung 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mel Gurtov

There are no affiliations available

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