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Introduction: Theory and the Long-Running Tussle

  • James C. Hsiung

Abstract

Rarely, if ever in human history, did two nations culturally and ethnically as close as China and Japan find themselves in a relationship marked so much more by blood and tears than by joy and jubilation—over a span of time measured not by years or decades, but by centuries. A loose though much shorter parallel in Europe might be the tangle between France and Germany,1 both of which were at each other’s throats beginning with the Franco-Prussian War of 1870 and culminating in the conflicts that were part of the two savage world wars of the twentieth century. Yet following the German defeat at the end of World War II, the two nations have learned to live in peace.

Keywords

Security Council Liberal Democratic Party Pearl Harbor Yasukuni Shrine Japanese Militarism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© James C. Hsiung 2007

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  • James C. Hsiung

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