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The Design of Post-Observation Feedback and Its Impact on Student Teachers

  • Nur Kurtoglu Hooton
Chapter
Part of the Communicating in Professions and Organizations book series (PSPOD)

Abstract

Exchanges as in the extract above would be immediately recognisable to any student teacher who has received feedback on her/his teaching practice. Teacher educators expect these teachers to do teaching practice and they themselves observe the teaching, and give feedback — to the whole group and/or to individuals. They also expect student teachers to reflect on the feedback that they have received. This is all part of a recognisable framework for teaching practice observation. But what about the possible effec. of the feedback on those teachers?

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© Nur Kurtoglu Hooton 2008

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  • Nur Kurtoglu Hooton

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