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Democracy, Ecology and Ecocide in Asia: Critical Reflections

  • Peter Stoett
Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

It is fitting to begin with an admission that this chapter suffers from a multiple purpose disorder. It is intended firstly to comment upon the preceding chapter written by Lawrence Surendra, which is an excellent survey of the current state of resistance to industrialization in contemporary Asia (and is in itself an update of an essay presented to a seminar entitled ‘Asia in the 1990s: Making and Meeting a New World’). Not surprisingly, Surendra applies his broad knowledge of Asian issues and politics with his usual depth for the particular to produce an engaging and challenging essay.

Keywords

Civil Society Political Economy Global Governance Shrimp Farming Currency Crisis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Stoett

There are no affiliations available

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