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The Debris of Post-Authoritarianism in Indonesia

  • Ariel Heryanto
Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

Prospects for Indonesia’s democracy, or the lack thereof, have drawn interest among analysts for years, usually in a critical and pessimistic vein. Understandably, attention to the topic grew remarkably at the time immediately following the resignation of President Suharto on May 21, 1998. The event marked the official demise of his heavily militarist authoritarian regime of 32 years, called Orde Baru (the New Order), the most durable among authoritarian regimes in capitalist states. Suharto’s resignation took place only two months after his being re-elected for the seventh time by members of the MPR (Majelis Permusyawaratan Rakyat, People’s General Assembly), and in the midst of the nation-wide and largely unorganized demonstrations that called for the end of his rule. Since then friendly diplomats and journalists have hopefully referred to Indonesia as the world’s third largest democracy.

Keywords

Middle Class Authoritarian Regime Political Violence Distant Observer Eastern Economic Review 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ariel Heryanto

There are no affiliations available

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