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Modern Japan and the Quest for Attractive Power

  • Akiko Fukushima
Part of the Palgrave Macmillan Series in Global Public Diplomacy book series (GPD)

Abstract

After reopening its doors to the outside world in 1868, at the end of the Edo period, Japan sought to catch up with Europe and the United States. It wanted to be recognized as a “great power.” Then, following the Second World War, Japan focused on becoming an economic power. More recently, aided by international recognition of its popular culture, it has focused on the role of culture in weaving its international relations, exploring ways of becoming an attractive power.

Keywords

Foreign Policy Japanese Government Liberal Democratic Party Human Security Soft Power 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Sook Jong Lee and Jan Melissen 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akiko Fukushima

There are no affiliations available

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