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An Elephant in a China Shop? India’s Look North to Central Asia … Seeing Only China

  • Emilian Kavalski
Part of the The Sciences Po Series in International Relations and Political Economy book series

Abstract

The evaluation of New Delhi’s agency in Central Asia attests to the regionalization of India’s post-cold war foreign policy—that is, the development of distinct external policies toward different global regions. In this respect, the discourses of India’s relations with Central Asia offer insights into the country’s strategic culture and the modes of security governance that it fashions. It has to be noted from the outset that this chapter undertakes an assessment of the narrative construction of India’s involvement in Central Asia. The claim is that by focusing on the discourses of foreign policy making, this mode of analysis offers the opportunity to simultaneously experience and deduce the ingredients that go into the articulation of New Delhi’s external outlook.2 In other words, the discursive engagement with India’s interactions in Central Asia not only indicates that India has a “strategic will” but also probes “how [New Delhi] will manifest it in action.”3

Keywords

Foreign Policy Nuclear Test Bilateral Relation Indian Commentator Grand Strategy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Marlène Laruelle, Jean-François Huchet, Sébastien Peyrouse, and Bayram Balci 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emilian Kavalski

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