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Industry: A Broad Overview

  • Mozammel Huq
  • Michael Tribe
Chapter

Abstract

The term ‘industry’ has a number of different meanings, not least when contrasting colloquial or conversational meanings with more precise economic definitions within national income accounting conventions. The ‘industrial sector’ in national income accounting terms, according to the United Nations International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), refers to manufacturing, mining and quarrying, construction, electricity, gas and water supply (including waste management) (UN, 2008, pp. 275–276, Table 4.2). However, within discussion of ‘industrialisation’ the meaning often tends to be restricted only to the manufacturing sector.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mozammel Huq
    • 1
  • Michael Tribe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsUniversity of StrathclydeGlasgowUK

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