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The Conceptual Framework of “Moral Power”

  • Syuzanna Vasilyan
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter represents a theoretical scrutiny and proposes a novel objective and neutralized conceptual framework, which is applied to the examination of the policy of the European Union (EU) towards the South Caucasus holistically. It draws on literature from political science, political philosophy, international relations theories, foreign policy and European Studies to review and revamp the role of “morality” and to disentangle the concept of “power”. The devised conceptual framework of “moral power” comprises seven parameters of “morality”, namely consequentialism, coherence, consistency, balance between values and interests, normative steadiness, inclusiveness and external legitimacy, and three types of “power”, specifically, “potential”, “actual” and “actualized”. Additional conceptual nuances are also introduced. The framework is potentially applicable to any policy of any foreign actor in any geographic area.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Syuzanna Vasilyan
    • 1
  1. 1.Université Libre de BruxellesBrusselsBelgium

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