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Understanding the Autistic Individual: A Practical Guide to Critical Discourse Analysis

  • Charlotte Brownlow
  • Lindsay O’Dell
  • Tanya Machin
Chapter
Part of the The Language of Mental Health book series (TLMH)

Abstract

In this chapter, Brownlow et al. seek to explore the positioning of individuals with autism within clinical consultation sessions. They draw upon the previous work of Edley (Discourse as data: A guide for analysis. Sage, 2001) in applying the principles of critical discursive psychology to a section of data drawn from a clinical consultation session. In doing this, they use the data to illustrate how the method of analysis works in practice. The chapter explores issues of power, dominant repertoires, positioning, and ideological dilemmas operating within the therapeutic context. Discussion of the strengths and limitations of the method of data analysis are considered, in addition to implications for researchers using the method.

References

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Recommended Reading

  1. Breeze, R. (2011). Critical discourse analysis and its critics. Pragmatics, 21(4), 493–525.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Davidson, J., & Orsini, M. (2013). Critical autism studies: Notes on an emerging field. In J. Davidson & M. Orsini (Eds.), Worlds of Autism: Across the spectrum of neurological difference (pp. 1–30). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Wodak, R., & Meyer, M. (2015). Methods of critical discourse studies. London: Sage.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charlotte Brownlow
    • 1
  • Lindsay O’Dell
    • 2
  • Tanya Machin
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Psychology and CounsellingThe University of Southern QueenslandToowoombaAustralia
  2. 2.Faculty of WellbeingEducation and Language Studies at the Open UniversityMilton KeynesUK

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